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So what is the Transportation Corps, and who does the museum represent? 
See below to find out...... 


Special Duty: White House Transportation Agency  ~ Special Assignment~(WHTA)
 
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The White House Transportation Agency (WHTA) provides transportation support to the White House as directed by the White House Military Office.
 
[1] This includes 24/7 ground transportation for the President's family, the White House staff, official visitors of the First Family and other authorized personnel. Members of the WHTA perform all duties associated with transportation, including driving armored cars, preparing Air Force One for take-off, and driving in the presidential motorcade.
 
[2] Staff of the agency are all noncommissioned officers of the United States Army.
Major Duties: 

Skill Level 4  Serve in a nominative Presidential Support Duty assignment under the operational control of the White House Military Office; provides world-wide ground transportation to the First Family, senior White House officials, and visiting official guests; maintains, operates, and accounts for seven different vehicle models and highly sensitive communications equipment valued in excess of $250,000; plans and conducts advance reconnaissance and operates WHMO vehicles in support of Presidential motorcades throughout the world; provides logistical support to Air Force One services (PMCS) on vehicles. Operates in the truck terminal as a squad leader. Trains new drivers and manages the driver sustainment training program. Plans, organizes, and operates a motor vehicle convoy. Performs convoy route reconnaissance. Commands a convoy march unit or serial. Supervises transporting of all types of cargo. Posts and controls guards used to prevent pilferage and vandalism of cargo and equipment. Takes charge of vehicle recovery. Supervises personnel preparing vehicles for deployment.

Related State Licenses
 
  • First-Line Supervisors of Transportation and Material-Moving Machine and Vehicle Operators
 
Related National Certifications and Federal Licenses
 
  • Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)
  • Certified Manager (CM   
  • Certified Manager of Quality/Organizational Excellence (CMQ/OE)    
  • Certified Quality Improvement Associate (CQIA)   
  • CompTIA Project+ Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA)
  • Program Management Professional (PgMP)    
  • Project Management Professional (PMP)
  • PSI Certified Associate Business Coordinator (PCABC)  
  • Six Sigma Black Belt (CSSBB)  
  • Six Sigma Green Belt (CSSGB)    
  • Six Sigma Yellow Belt (CSSYB)
Related White House Support Certifications 
 
  • Improvised IED Awareness Program, Surveillance Identification and Operations Program
 
  • Senior Master Driver Advanced Driver Program
 
  • Antiterrorism Evasive Driving Course
 
  • Flight line certification.
News Article
Security Clearance Mandatory

Transportation Senior Sergeant - Logistics manager - (88Z);  
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Major Duties: 
Supervises the operation and control of movement for personnel and cargo by air, rail, motor transport, and water.
 
The transportation senior sergeant supervises the operation and control of movement for personnel and cargo by air, rail, motor transport and water, maintenance-of-way, maintenance of equipment and technical expert on all matters relating to railway operations. Manages and coordinates the operation and maintenance of Army watercraft and maintains records of strength, location and employment of railway personnel equipment. Serves as the principal NCO associated with SQI M in transportation companies. Assist in the coordination and implementation of operations, administration, training programs and communications activities. Account for location, employment and deployment of organic operating equipment and maintenance activities. Plans and lays out a maintenance shop and facilities. Coordinate transportation actions with subordinate and serviced activities. Consolidates, prepares, reviews and processes regular and special reports of command transportation and watercraft activities. Plans, manages, and monitors unit motor transport operations as the senior truck master. Establishes and organizes the unit motor park. Prepares and implements the truck company security and defense plan. Prepares map overlays. Receives and prepares highway reconnaissance data for motor convoy transport. Supervises and directs unit dispatching of vehicles. Coordinates engineer requirements to support a truck battalion

Related State Licenses
 
  • First-Line Supervisors of Transportation and Material-Moving Machine and Vehicle Operators
 
Related National Certifications and Federal Licenses
 
  • Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)
  • Certified Manager (CM   
  • Certified Manager of Quality/Organizational Excellence (CMQ/OE)    
  • Certified Quality Improvement Associate (CQIA)   
  • CompTIA Project+ Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA)
  • Program Management Professional (PgMP)    
  • Project Management Professional (PMP)
  • PSI Certified Associate Business Coordinator (PCABC)  
  • Six Sigma Black Belt (CSSBB)  
  • Six Sigma Green Belt (CSSGB)    
  • Six Sigma Yellow Belt (CSSYB)
Security Clearance Required
 
E8 First Sergeants are co-responsible for a company of multiple skill sets totaling 100 individuals on average
 
E9 Command Sergeant Major (depending on level and years in service) are co-responsible for either a battalion of 800, brigade of 3000 or more.
Multi-Modal
Operations
Motor Transport Operators - Truck Drivers- (88M);
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  1. Title 4

Major Duties: 
Supervises or operates wheel vehicles to transport personnel and cargo.
 
Skill Level 1 Operates all wheel vehicles and equipment over varied terrain and roadways for support of combat operations. Manages loading and unloading of personnel being transported. Oversees and checks proper loading and unloading of cargo on vehicles and trailers. Secures cargo against inclement weather, pilferage, and damage. Operates vehicle component material handling equipment (MHE) as required. Employs land navigation techniques. Must be knowledgeable with the operation of radios and weapons when they are mounted on the vehicle. Performs vehicle self-recovery and field expedients to include towing vehicles. Corrects or reports all vehicle deficiencies; supports mechanics where necessary. Prepares vehicle for movement/shipment by air, rail, or vessel.
 
Skill Level 2 Supervises and provides technical guidance to subordinates in accomplishing their duties. Organizes and participates in convoys. Dispatches vehicles and verifies vehicle logbooks. Receives and fills requests from authorized persons for motor transport. Compiles time, mileage, and load data. Operates the Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Transport (HEMTT), Heavy Equipment Transporter (HET), and Palletized Loading System (PLS) vehicles to include performing self-recovery operations.
 
Skill Level 3 Supervises drivers performing preventive maintenance checks and services (PMCS) on vehicles. Operates in the truck terminal as a squad leader. Trains new drivers and manages the driver sustainment training program. Plans, organizes, and operates a motor vehicle convoy. Performs convoy route reconnaissance. Commands a convoy march unit or serial. Supervises transporting of all types of cargo. Posts and controls guards used to prevent pilferage and vandalism of cargo and equipment. Takes charge of vehicle recovery. Supervises personnel preparing vehicles for deployment.
 
Skill Level 4 Provides professional support and technical guidance to all Army soldiers requiring motor transport. Plans, manages, and monitors unit motor transport operations as the truck master. Establishes and organizes the unit motor park. Prepares and implements the truck company security and defense plan. Prepares map overlays. Receives and distributes highway motor transport missions. Assembles and prepares highway reconnaissance data for motor convoy transport. Supervises and directs unit dispatching of vehicles. Coordinates engineer requirements to support a truck battalion.

Related State Licenses
 
  • Cargo and Freight Agents
 
  • First-Line Supervisors of Transportation and Material-Moving Machine and Vehicle Operators
 
  • Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers
 
  • Light Truck or Delivery Services Drivers
 
  • Transportation Managers
 

Related National Certifications and Federal Licenses
 
  • Automobile Service Consultant (C1)  
 
  • Automobile/Light Truck - Engine Repair (A1)
 
  • Certified Hazardous Materials Practitioner (CHMP)
 
  • Certified Master Automobile Technicians
 
  • Certified Packaging Professional (CPP)
 
  • Commercial Driver License (CDL)    
  • Double/Triple Trailer Endorsement (T) 
  
  • Global Logistics Associate (GLA)   
 
  • Medium/Heavy Truck - Preventive Maintenance Inspection (PMI)
  • Passenger Endorsement (P)
 
  • School Bus Endorsement
 
  • Tank Vehicle Endorsement (N)
 
  • Transit Bus - Preventive Maintenance And Inspection (PMI) (H8)
Video
Security Clearance
may be
Required
Transportation Management Coordinators - Personnel and commodity movement coordinator- (88N);
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  1. NAME OF PRODUCT
Major Duties: 
Coordinates, monitors, controls and supervises the movement of personnel, equipment, and cargo by air, rail, highway, and water. Determines the most efficient mode of transport that accomplishes mission requirements.
 
Skill Level 1 Advises military and DOD civilians of their entitlements for shipment of personal property and passenger travel and prepares the necessary documentation. Requests and coordinates transport capability to meet a movement mission. Marks and labels cargo and freight shipments in accordance with regulatory requirements. Documents and inventories freight, cargo, and material shipments of all types; operates automated data terminal equipment to prepare movement documentation or related correspondence. Arranges documentation and reports for follow-up or response to tracer actions. Prepares transportation movements documents and related forms for the type of shipment and mode of travel (e.g., GBLs, MTAs, GTRs, airline service requests, etc.). Performs office duties such as posting regulations, files maintenance, and routine office correspondence.
 
 
 
Skill Level 2 Provides supervision and technical guidance for subordinates. Researches, interprets, prepares, and coordinates actions pertaining to travel entitlements. Functions as the customs officer for shipment releases in overseas theaters. Operates as quality control NCO for commercial movement contracts. Monitors all freight, cargo, and material shipments to ensure accountability. Identifies and reports problem areas within the traffic management system to prevent additional costs, losses, and damage. Conducts briefings for unit moves. Requests, coordinates, and monitors movement schedules and programs; ensures transport capability is appropriate, cost effective, and meets mission requirements. Checks and inspects equipment blocking and bracing. Prepares and consolidates transportation movement reports. Operates automated data processing equipment to document movement information, conducts research, monitors movements, inspects commercial contracts, and responds to shipment inquiries, discrepancies, and routine movements transactions.
 
 
Skill Level 3 Conducts a training program for subordinate personnel. Supervises the operation of a cargo and material documentation unit, a movement control branch or section, a break bulk point/terminal warehouse, a trailer transfer point, a port operations unit, an air terminal section, and the installation personal property and passenger travel section. Evaluates work techniques and procedures for all functions. Maintains liaison with air, rail, highway, and water transportation facilities. Initiates, researches, and proposes necessary changes to the traffic management system for cost effectiveness and mission requirements. Supervises customs officers and reviews customs procedures in overseas theaters. Prepares, consolidates, and reviews technical, personnel, and administrative reports and forms covering transportation matters (e.g., unit movement, personal property, passenger travel, freight/cargo and material movement reports). Checks, reviews, and consolidates movement requirements; ensures appropriate transport capability and prepares movement schedules. Assists in planning transportation requirements for logistical support. Supervises any diversion, re-consignment, or transfer of personnel, freight, and material shipments for all modes of transportation.
 
 
 
Skill Level 4 Supervises cargo documentation and movement control units for all transportation modes. Supervises freight, cargo, personal property, and passenger travel at installation level. Analyzes, evaluates, and proposes changes to the Defense Transportation System. Formulates and reviews documentation on technical traffic management functions. Devises and reviews movement programs for logistical support functions in a theater of operations. Serves as the transportation liaison representative between other military services, commercial agencies, and host nation support elements. Advisor for the preparation of operation orders where transportation is required. Reviews DOD contracts and agreements with host nations. Verifies the accuracy of movement control documents. Evaluates sites for depots, truck terminals, railheads, beachheads, air terminals, and water ports/terminals. Determines transportation capabilities and limitations of units. Performs as staff NCO in military traffic management agencies. Monitors quality controls that ensure commercial transportation services meet contract obligations. Monitors and documents all customs discrepancies and reports them to appropriate authorities. Ensures allocation of transport capability is appropriate to accomplish each mission in a cost effective manner.

Related State Licenses
 
 
  • Cargo and Freight Agents
 
  • First-Line Supervisors of Office and Administrative Support Workers
 
  • First-Line Supervisors of Transportation and Material-Moving Machine and Vehicle Operators
 
  • Management Analysts
 
Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerks
 
  • Storage and Distribution Managers
Transportation Managers
 
 
 

Related National Certifications and Federal Licenses
 
  • Associate Safety Professional (ASP) 
SECTION_END_PROMO_RELATED_CERT_COLUMN    
Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)   
 
  • Certified Hazardous Materials Practitioner (CHMP)
 
  • Certified Packaging Professional
Certified Safety Professional (CSP)
 
  • Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP)
 
  • Certified Transportation Professional (CTP)
 
  • Global Logistics Associate (GLA)
 
  • Project Management Professional (PMP)
Video
Security Clearance Required
Cargo specialists  - Stevedores - (88H); 
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  1. NAME OF PRODUCT
Major Duties: 
Transfers or supervises the transfer of passengers and cargo to and from air, land, and water transport by manual and mechanical methods.
 
Skill Level 1 Checks, tallies, and documents cargo utilizing both manual and automated data processing systems. Rigs ships’ gear as part of a team. Loads and unloads supplies and equipment from ships, docks, beaches, railheads, boxcars, warehouses, motor vehicles, and aircraft (to include internal and external helicopter loading). Operates and maintains all types and sizes of winches, cranes, and forklifts.
 
 
 
Skill Level 2 Assigns cargo handlers, signal, and winch operators to duty stations. Provides technical guidance to subordinates. Inspects cargo, supervises cargo checking and hatch operations, controls aircraft loading and unloading, oversees railhead tie-down crews, directs container filling and emptying, plans warehouse storage, and manages crane operations. Supervises operator maintenance for cargo handling equipment such as cranes and forklifts. Enforces safety practices and documentation procedures.
 
Skill Level 3 Plans work schedules for terminal operations, airfield arrival/departure control groups (to include passengers), and container/trailer transfer points. Utilizes stowage plans, aircraft load plans, and other cargo handling forms. Issues material handling equipment, nets, slings, ropes, cables, wire rope, and other cargo operations gear. Enforces safety practices. Prepares, consolidates, and reviews administrative, personnel, and technical reports covering unit activities.
 
Skill Level 4 Supervises and manages work force. Co-ordinates administrative matters, communications activities, and training programs. Prepares tactical plans and training materials. Provides staff supervision, policy, and guidance for personnel and cargo movement by air, rail, motor, and water transport.

Related State Licenses
 
 
  • Cargo and Freight Agents
 
  • First-Line Supervisors of Transportation and Material-Moving Machine and Vehicle Operators
 
  • Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerks
 
  • Storage and Distribution Managers
 
  • Transportation Managers
Video
No
Security Clearance Required
  • Lattice Boom Crane
  • Mobile Crane Operator - Lattice Boom Crawler Cranes
  • Mobile Crane Operator - Lattice Boom Truck Crane (LBT)
  • Mobile Crane Operator - Telescopic Boom Crane Fixed Cab
  • Mobile Crane Operator - Telescopic Boom Cranes Swing Cab
  • Professional Designation in Logistics and Supply Chain Management      
  • Project Management Professional (PMP)
  • Rigger Level I
  • Rough Terrain/All Terrain Crane-Single Control Station, Fixed Controls
  • Rubber Tire Truck Mount Crane Boom Truck-Telescopic Boom, Fixed Controls
  • Rubber Tire Truck Mount Crane, Boom Truck-Articulating Boom, Fixed Controls
  • Rubber Tire Truck Mount Crane, Lattice Boom, Friction Machinery
  • Rubber Tire Truck Mount Crane, Lattice Boom, Hydraulic Machinery
  • Service Truck Crane Operator
  • Signalperson
  • Telescopic Boom Crane
 
Related National Certifications and Federal Licenses
 
  • Associate Safety Professional   SECTION_BEGIN_PROMO_RELATED_CERT_COLUMN    SECTION_END_PROMO_RELATED_CERT_COLUMN    
  • Boom Truck Crane
  • Boom Truck Fixed Cab Operator
  • Certified Administrative Professional (CAP)
  • Certified Hazardous Materials Practitioner
  • Certified in Transportation and Logistics (CTL)   
  • Certified Packaging Professional
  • Certified Records Manager (CRM)
  • Certified Safety Professional (CSP)
  • Crawler Mount Crane, Lattice Boom, Friction
  • Crawler Mount Crane, Lattice Boom,
  • Crawler Mount Crane, Telescopic Boom
  • Global Logistics Associate (GLA)  SECTION_END_PROMO_RELATED_CERT_COLUMN    
  • Industrial/All Purpose Crane
  • Internet and Computing Core Certification


Watercraft Engineers - vessel systems and engine repairmen- (88L); 
 
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  1. NAME OF PRODUCT
Major Duties: 
Supervises or performs unit, direct support (DS), and general support (GS) maintenance. Services Army watercraft, amphibians and auxiliary equipment on marine vessels.
 
Skill Level 1 Stands engine room and throttle watch while the vessel is underway. Stands anchor watch and ramp discharge watch during sea and anchor details and while the vessel is in port. Performs daily systems checks and posts all instrument and gage readings to the engineer log book. Positions fuel control racks and adjusts throttle controls to maximize engine efficiency. Inspects, troubleshoots, tests, services, adjusts, repairs, and replaces batteries, electrical system components, fuel system elements, propellers and propeller shafts, pumping assemblies and parts, and other marine engine equipment. Cleans, performs surface preparation, and paints engineer space equipment.
 
Skill Level 2 Provides supervision and technical expertise for subordinates performing their duties. Prepares marine vessel equipment for operation. Starts, operates, troubleshoots, and secures vessel engines. Inspects, services, adjusts, replaces, repairs, and overhauls engine components, throttle controls, accessory drives, boiler and piping systems, vessel steering mechanisms, electrical and wiring assemblies, cooling and lubrication systems, and vessel hulls for general upkeep. Computes fuel requirements and documents vessel fuel usage. Compiles and maintains the engine room records.
 
Skill Level 3 Supervises fire fighting, damage control, sanitation, and pollution control procedures aboard a vessel. Establishes and enforces engine department safety practices and supervises shipboard watches. Oversees, instructs, and provides technical advice in the maintenance of engines, electrical systems, cooling systems, lubrication systems, refrigeration systems, fuel systems, pneumatic systems, power and drive trains, steering systems, boilers and piping, hydraulics, and general vessel upkeep. Conducts crew or section drills and training. Prepares standard operating procedures (SOPs) for maintenance and organizes the work of the maintenance shop.
 
Skill Level 4 Instructs and supervises marine engine department personnel in all systems maintenance. Oversees posting of vessel log books, forms, and records. Assigns personnel to duty positions. Schedules equipment for calibration. Establishes maintenance priorities. Prepares and reviews shipyard specifications. Prepares marine vessel historical reports and records, preventive maintenance schedules and records, material readiness reports, equipment improvement recommendations, and unsatisfactory/faulty equipment reports. Records required and completed modifications.

Related State Licenses
 
  • Motorboat Operators
 
  • Pilots, Ship
 
  • Sailors and Marine Oilers
 
  • Ship and Boat Captains
 
  • Ship Engineers
 
Related National Certifications and Federal Licenses
 
  • Associate Safety Professional (ASP)
 
  • Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)
 
  • Certified Hazardous Materials Practitioner (CHMP)
 
  • Certified Safety Professional (CSP)
 
  •  Global Logistics Associate (GLA)
 
  • Project Management Professional (PMP)
Video
No
Security Clearance Required

Watercraft Operator - deck hand/vessel operator - (88K);
 
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  1. NAME OF PRODUCT
Major Duties: 
Performs mariner duties and supervises other personnel on Army watercraft and amphibians.
 
Skill Level 1 Docks and undocks the vessels. Drops and weighs the vessel anchor. Stands lookout and helm watches. Identifies and interprets single-letter international code signal flags. Sends and receives messages with radios, beacons, and signal flags. Operates and maintains lifeboats and vessel firefighting equipment. Knowledgeable in all aspects of marlinespike seamanship. Secures all type of cargo using shipboard machinery such as capstans, winches, hoists, and davits. Paints metal, wood, and fiberglass surfaces. Cleans compartments and decks.
 
Skill Level 2 Provides supervision and technical guidance for subordinates. Maintains vessel charts, publications, and orders. Keeps the vessel log book. Navigates a boat or other watercraft. Beaches and retracts landing craft. Tows vessels and barges in harbors and inter-coastal waterways.
 
Skill Level 3 Instructs subordinates in watercraft and amphibian operational practices, procedures, and techniques. Supervises the embarking and disembarking of troops from the vessel. Establishes and enforces safety procedures. Schedules shipboard watches. Prepares vessel load plans. Schedules and oversees deck maintenance. Supervises maintenance of life saving and firefighting equipment.
 
Skill Level 4 Applies Inland and International navigation rules while operating vessels. Conducts crew drills and supervises training on the vessel. Disseminates information on weather and navigational aid changes. Maintains the vessel station bill and crew list. Operates the Mark 27 gyrocompass. Processes operations and intelligence information. Receives, stores, distributes, and turns in vessel supplies, equipment, and food. Administers the vessel mess functions to include all money exchanges, headcount records, daily cook worksheets, and food utilization reports. Coordinates the operation of collective lighter control points (LCPs).
 
Related State Licenses
 
  • Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand
 
  • Mates- Ship, Boat, and Barge
 
  • Motorboat Operators
 
  • Pilots, Ship
 
  • Sailors and Marine Oilers
 
  • Ship and Boat Captains

Related National Certifications and Federal Licenses
 
  • Automobile Service Consultant (C1)
 
  • Certified Counter Terrorism Specialist (CCTS)
 
  • Certified Hazardous Materials Practitioner (CHMP)
 
  • Certified Safety Professional (CSP)
 
  • Global Logistics Associate (GLA)
 
Video
No
Security Clearance Required
Vessel Class Certification
 
Class A2

LSV , LT-800, LT-100, JHSV

Class A-1
  • Landing craft utility (LCU)-1646, LCU-2000
 
Class B
  • Landing craft mechanized (all), Sideloadable warping tug,
  • Small tug (ST) 900, Warping tug, Causeway ferry

Class C
  • Barge , cargo (BC) (All), Barge, derrick (BD),Fuel barge (BG),
  • Roll on/roll off discharge facility (RRDF), Floating causeway
     
The Army Reserve Expeditionary Railway Center
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To meet its Title 10 requirement to support the geographic combatant commands in using rail service as a combat multiplier, the Army Reserve has created the Expeditionary Railway Center.
In 2010, the Chief of Transportation, Brigadier General Edward F. Dorman III, identified a requirement gap in the Army's Title 10 responsibility to support the geographic combatant commands (COCOMs) in effectively employing rail as a strategic multiplier throughout full-spectrum operations (FSO). The gap was significant because a functional analysis identified effective rail planning, assessment, analysis, and advisement as a geographic COCOM requirement.
 
Force Design Update

Host-nation support will undoubtedly become a larger function of the geostrategic environment of the 21st century. Since infrastructure and theater transportation are inextricably connected to the broader geostrategic environment, the current Chief of Transportation, Colonel (P) Stephen E. Farmen, has focused on modernizing Army rail capabilities that can exploit host-nation resources within the transportation spectrum.
 
This effort has led to a force design update (FDU) that will provide the rail capabilities required for the contemporary operational environment. This FDU for the existing Army rail structure is essential since it has been more than 22 years since the last Army rail FDU. The FDU's result is the Army Reserve (USAR) Expeditionary Railway Center (ERC), which will be an enduring Army rail capability for FSO. This FDU was approved by the Army Training and Doctrine Command's Army Capabilities Integration Center.
 
This new rail force structure will augment any COCOM's efforts in planning and advising on the use of host-nation railroads to expand and expedite distribution within its area of responsibility. This new design will provide full-spectrum capability in all phases of an operation. In a period of diminishing military transportation assets, we must look at doing more with less, and using host-nation railroads is one way of rising to this challenge.
 
Expeditionary Railway Center Mission

The mission of the ERC will contrast significantly with the mission of the 757th Transportation Battalion (Railway). The ERC will—
Provide rail network capability and infrastructure assessments.
Perform rail mode feasibility studies and provide advice on the employment of rail capabilities.

Perform and track railway rolling stock capability assessments, and provide an Engineer officer to facilitate railroad capability assessments and rebuild efforts.
 
  • Coordinate rail and bridge safety assessments.
  • Perform and assist with rail planning in support of military strategic and operational requirements.
  • Perform functions as the primary advisers on railway operations, including collaborating with host-nation railway officials to improve the national railroad business model and support nation building.
  • Coordinate use and deconfliction of host-nation or contracted rail assets.
  • Perform contracting officer’s representative duties to oversee contracts and provide quality assurance.
  • Provide command, control, and supervision for subordinate railway personnel.
 
Army Rail Transformation

It has been evident since early in Operation Iraqi Freedom that the existing Army rail capability must be transformed to provide relevant support for the contemporary conflict. In Iraq, the Army missed the opportunity to maintain an Army rail planning and assessment capability at interagency and various military headquarters levels, along with an assessment, advisory, and training assistance presence with the Iraqi Republican Railroad. Coalition distribution and the nation of Iraq could have benefited significantly from this investment. Dave DeCarme, who served as the Department of State (DOS) transportation attaché in Baghdad, Iraq, from 2008 to 2009, made the following observation:
 
As part of civil/military coordination and cooperation efforts in developing host-nation capacities, the U.S. Army rail transformation, working with U.S., coalition, and host-nation civilian elements, has the potential for improving rail system operations which in turn can be a significant contributor to broader economic development.
 
 
Employer Partnership Initiative

Sustaining this critical expeditionary and international engagement capability can be accomplished in
part through effective stationing of the ERC planning and advisory teams in cities where we find Class 1 railroad headquarters or their interchange points. We will continue to capitalize on the benefits of the employer partnership of the Armed Forces, an initiative begun by Lieutenant General Stultz. This partnership is a win-win situation for servicemembers, employers, and the Nation. Today, several U.S. railroads are employer partners.
Our railroads are a fine example of the potential for access to civilian-acquired skills. Employer partnership of the Armed Forces offers a great opportunity for the Army Reserve to take advantage of the rail expertise offered by U.S. railroad employees. Many of these railroads actively seek to hire employees with military experience who are a good fit for the 24-hours-a-day, 365-days-a-year culture of the railroad industry. Military experience translates to management opportunities with U.S. railroads.
 
Army Railway Planning and Advisory Team

The Army will benefit by capitalizing on the skillrich characteristics of Army Reserve warrior citizens.

However, the Army Reserve must not run the ERC without SDDC, the Army's "Global Surface Transportation Experts." The SDDC mission is to "provide expeditionary and sustained end-to-end deployment and distribution to meet the Nation's objectives." The SDDC vision is for its employees to be the "recognized and trusted leaders in delivering innovative end-to-end deployment and distribution excellence across the full range of military operations." Rail is a significant component
and enabler of the SDDC mission and vision. SDDC plays an important role in Army rail transformation for FSO.
Learn More
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Related State Licenses
 
  • Transportation Managers
 
  • Transportation Vehicle, Equipment and Systems Inspectors, Except Aviation
 

Related National Certifications and Federal Licenses

 
  • Global Logistics Associate (GLA)
 
  • Associate Safety Professional (ASP)
 
  • Train Service Engineer
 
  • Designated Supervisors of Locomotive Engineers
 
  • Locomotive Servicing Engineers
 
  • Student Engineers

 
Major Duties:   88U: Railway Operations Crewmember,  88T: Railway Section Repairer, and 88P: Railway Equipment Repairer have all merged into an expeditionary "advisory" role
 
Railway Operations Crewmembers are primarily responsible for supervising and operating diesel-electric locomotives and related equipment. They also serve as a crewmember or brakeman in the makeup and movement of railway cars/trains.

Duties performed by Soldiers in this MOS include:
Interprets train orders. Executed instructions received from signal towers, switches, other trains and trainmen. Signals with fuses, torpedoes, hands, flags, lamps, and engine whistles. Performs car coupling and uncoupling operations. Inspects cars at route stops; adjusts lashing and bracing to assure safe hauling of cargo. Advises dispatcher of arrival and departure times for all passing trains; compiles records of locations of all rolling stock. Performs lubrication orders on railway cars and makes minor running repairs. Seals cars and records seal numbers.
Supervises and provides technical guidance to subordinates performing their duties. Operates the locomotive's controls and safety appliances. Observes interprets, and executes instructions received from signal towers, switches, other trains, and trainmen. Coordinates train movements; complies with operating timetable, rulebook, and other specific instructions. Receives requisitions for empty cars and authorizes movement to locations for loading.
 
Note:  all three disciplines which include the 88U: Railway Operations worldwide.  Although merged, each miltary occupational specialty maintains its state certifications based on its skill set.
PARTNERSHIP FOR YOUTH SUCCESS (PaYS) Program
 
Those interested in this job may be eligible for civilian employment, after the Army, by enrolling in the Army PaYS program. The PaYS program is a recruitment option that guarantees a job interview with military friendly employers that are looking for experience and trained Veterans to join their organization.
 
  • Rush Enterprises
  • Ruan Transportation Mgt. Sys. Inc.
  • D. M. Bowman, Inc.
  • Liquid Transport Corp
  • Transport Corporation of America, Inc.
  • Sentinel Transportation, LLC
  • Nationwide Truck Brokers, Inc.
  • J. B. Hunt Transportation, Inc.
  • Total Quality Logistics, LLC
  • TMC Transportation, Inc.
Security Clearance
Dependent on Mission Requirements
Mobility Warrant Officers:
Multi-Model Managers
 
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  1. Title 1
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  4. Title 4
  The Mobility Warrant Officer (MWO),
 
Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) 882A, is the commander's key staff officer for deployment planning, execution, advice, coordination, and training. The MWO’s are competent and proven experts who help the commander minimize the complexity of deployment in a joint environment. Specifically, an MWO is a skilled technician who:
 
  • Advises the warfighting commander on all facets of the joint deployment process
  • Executes the rapid transmission of movement requirements in the Defense Transportation System
  • Develops and conducts unit training on the tactics, techniques, and procedures associated with unit deployment operations
  • Identifies and remedies force projection and strategic deployment shortcomings
  • Plans and coordinates the deployment and redeployment process
  • Provides expert traffic management, throughput, and operational-lift advice in CONUS and OCONUS
 
 
Institutional Training
 
    All candidates must successfully complete the Warrant Officer Candidate Course at Fort Rucker, Alabama. The new warrant officers then proceed to the Mobility Warrant Officer Basic Course at Fort Lee for a 19 week program of instruction that includes detailed course work in the joint deployment process, the Defense Transportation System, unit movement operations, strategic mobility operations, and joint deployment information systems. Students are taught to use a wide variety of transportation and deployment information systems, including the:
 
  • Joint Operations Planning and Execution System (JOPES)
  • Transportation Coordinator's Automated Information for Movement System II (TC-AIMS II)
  • Theater Operations System (TOPS)
  • Integrated Data Environment (IDE)/Global Transportation Network (GTN) Convergence (IGC)
  • Integrated Computerized Deployment System (ICODES)
  • Single Mobility System (SMS)
 
The course culminates in an integrated deployment exercise, during which the MWOs role-play supporting the deployment of a brigade-sized unit from CONUS to an overseas theater of operations. It leverages the work of the Transportation School, the Deployment Process Modernization Office, and the Joint Deployment Training Center at Fort Eustis. The intent is for MWOs to learn how to deploy Army forces under joint deployment conditions.
(GTN)
(TC-AIMS II)
(JOPES)
Security Clearance Required
Vessel Warrant Officers:
Deck & Engineering
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  TRANSPORTATION CORPS MARITIME WARRANT OFFICER

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
 
Background: Marine Deck and Engineering Warrant Officers of the Transportation Corps command, operate and maintain U.S. Army watercraft in support of the Army Strategic Mobility Program and CINC war-fighting requirements. The population of Transportation Corps maritime warrant officers is small in comparison to the size of the Army with most of these officers being assigned to transportation TO&E units. A significant portion of them and their watercraft assets reside in the Reserve Components. Transportation Corps maritime warrant officers support the Army at all command levels by planning, coordinating, training and operating Army watercraft for logistics over-the-shore (LOTS) and other maritime missions worldwide. Other than when under direct hostile fire, these warrant officers do their most demanding and dangerous work while underway aboard their assigned vessel. Distance off shore is not the sole factor in determining degree of difficulty of vessel operations. The littoral environment has many potentially devastating hazards which can kill Soldiers, destroy equipment and cause mission failure. These are the reasons the policies described here are necessary.

The utilization of warrant officers as ship’s officers aboard Army vessels was first implemented by an Act of Congress in July 1918 which established the Army Mine Planter Service and authorized the rank and grade of warrant officer to serve as Master, Mate, Chief Engineer and Assistant Engineer of each vessel. The use of warrant officers in this capacity has continued; the Army maritime warrant officer of today can trace his or her roots directly back to those officers aboard the Army Mine Planters.
All maritime warrant officer positions are open to male and female. A Transportation Corps maritime warrant officer performs his or her duties in a single Area of Concentration (AOC) throughout an entire career. The two AOCs have distinctly different skill bases and are not interchangeable. The distinction made is based upon the traditional organization of a ship officer’s duties. The practice of the U.S. Army is to comply with the maritime elements of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) to the extent feasible consistent with our mission. This has a direct influence on the training, development, and utilization of transportation maritime warrant officers.
 
 
 
 
Marine Deck Warrant Officer Duties:
 
Marine Operations (880): There is one Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) in this AOC with two distinct skill levels of technical training and professional credentials; MOS 880A1 and 880A2, Marine Deck Officer. This MOS commands and operates Army watercraft and watercraft detachments; may serve aboard Army watercraft as commanding officer, master, navigator, cargo officer, or deck watch officer; serves as Army harbormaster or port operations officer; may serve on battalion level staff or higher as an operations officer or as a service school instructor.  Commands Army Class A1 vessels operating on lakes, bays, sounds, and coastal waters. Responsible for proper operation of vessel including discipline of crew and seaworthiness of vessel. Navigates vessel using nautical charts, area plotting sheets, compass, sextant, terrestrial bearings, and electronic navigational aids. Directs course of vessel to avoid surface and underwater hazards, to include areas where ice is seen or reported. Directs operation of ship-to-shore radio and visual communication systems. Directs fueling, blasting, trimming operations, and cargo stowage.
Engineering Warrant Officer Duties:
 
Marine Maintenance (881): There is one MOS in this AOC with two distinct skill levels of technical training and professional credentials; MOS 881A1 and 881A2, Marine Engineering Officer. This MOS commands watercraft maintenance detachments and maintains Army watercraft, serving as chief engineer, assistant engineer, or engineering watch officer; may serve on battalion level staff or higher as a maintenance officer or as a service school instructor.
Security Clearance Required
Warrant Officer Development
 
Best understanding of this career path planning will be achieved by comparing the narrative description given below with the corresponding year on the TC Maritime Warrant Officer Career Model (Go to Career Model). It is intended that the warrant officer and his or her supervisors will jointly participate in the planning of the career path. An individual Career Path Worksheet (CPWS) is provided (Go to Work Sheet). For convenience, this worksheet may be reproduced and used to record the officer’s past, current and next duty assignment. The CPWS should be made a part of the officer’s OER Support Form (DA Form 67-9-1) or Junior Officer Developmental Support Form (DA Form 67-9-1a) and used during the rater and senior rater counseling. The "next intended" duty assignment should be agreed upon early in the current assignment with an approximate date for transfer indicated on the form. Once the CPWS is filled out, it must be signed by key leaders in the officer’s career management chain. This will be the officer’s rater, senior rater, and career manger (normally the Proponency Officer). Warrant officer professional development is described in terms of career phases, characterized by rank (WO1/CW2, CW3, CW4, CW5) as follows:      
 
Chief Warrant Officers (CWO) entering the Transportation Corps maritime field due to reclassification action, regardless of rank, must gain the appropriate experience starting with the WO1/CW2 career phase and progress through each successive level. This requirement to "start at the bottom" in terms of duty is intended to provide the same foundation of technical experience gained under supervision as is provided to new warrant officers. This will often result in having a reclassified CWO working in a duty position under the supervision of a junior "veteran" maritime warrant officer. This arrangement is not to be viewed as demeaning nor is it a reflection on the military or professional capabilities of the reclassified officer. The sole purpose is to allow the development of a experience base and help avoid costly mistakes due to inexperience. An accelerated utilization pattern will be necessary for these warrant officers, however, commanders must exercise care so as not to jeopardize the individual’s technical experience base. Soldiers appointed directly to CW2 will be credited with two years constructive warrant officer service as WO1/CW2; however, the initial assignment will be to an A1 position onboard a class A2 vessel.
 
There is, in the maritime community (Merchant Marine, Navy, Coast Guard and Army), a clear and legal distinction between ship’s officers and the crew of vessels. A maritime officer is one who is qualified by a formal training and examination process to command a vessel or be in charge of a navigational or engineering watch. Army mariners are required to operate their vessels with the same skill, knowledge and competence required of all maritime officers operating in international waters. The high degree of skill and technical knowledge required to do this with competence can only be achieved through a process of professional development that is global in scope and linked in a logical pattern. This professional development for each warrant officer must be progressive and carefully plotted to ensure that the needs of the Army are met and the officer is well prepared to meet the ever increasing challenge of his or her career specialty.
 
Transportation Corps maritime warrant officers are professionally developed through a succession of schooling and assignments described below and in accordance with the Transportation Corps Maritime Warrant Officer Career Model. In order for the intent of this policy to work properly, all leaders who influence the assignment and training of warrant officers should understand the overall strategy and must cooperate with the Proponency Officer in the Office of the Chief of Transportation. The broad intent of this policy is that warrant officers be developed to fulfill the total definition given them by the Total Warrant Officer System.
 
Careful reading of this guidance, combined with assistance from the senior warrant officers, should be effective in fulfilling the leadership obligations of commanders who must make wise career developmental decisions for the good of the Army.
Our Commissioned Officers:
 
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Security Clearance Required

 Transportation Corps Induction Ceremony

  Army Officer Commissioning Programs

 
 
Officer Candidate School (OCS) –
This school is restricted to those soldiers who have a secret security clearance, pass a physical exam, score a minimum of 110 on the General Technical Aptitude Test, have the ability to obtain a bachelor’s degree within a year, and pass the SAT or ACT standards. Educational, leadership and physical training in the OCS is accomplished over a period of 14 weeks.
 
 
 
 
Reserved Officer Training Corps (ROTC) –
This is a program for students attending college who are under 23 years of age at the time of enrollment. The program includes paying for tuition while obtaining a commission as an officer. Completing Military Science courses as well as training during academic breaks gets you ready for a career as an
officer. Qualifications include having no criminal record, a high school
diploma or GED, score a 1000 on the SAT or a 45 on the ACT, and you
must be accepted to the college.
 
 
 
West Point Academy –
This is an educational atmosphere for those with a
high moral character who are under 23 years old. Soldiers looking to
enroll must have an endorsement from their commander. You will also need
to have a high school education or a GED as well as a high score on the
SAT or the ACT. The program is only open to 2000 soldier per year.
TRANSPORTATION OFFICER (88A)
 
The Transportation Corps is responsible for moving supplies, troops and equipment anywhere on the globe. During war, the Transportation Corps utilizes trucks, boats and airplanes to provide extremely fast support to the combat teams on the frontlines. Transportation Officers are experts in the systems, vehicles and procedures in moving troops and supplies in the Army.
 
The responsibilities of a Transportation Lieutenant may include:
Commanding and controlling Transportation operations and combined armed forces during land combat.
Coordinating employment of Transportation Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.
 
TRAINING:
Transportation Officer training includes completion of the Transportation Officer Basic Course (TOBC), where you will learn leadership skills, tactics, maintenance and operational aspects of weapons and vehicles used in a Transportation platoon. Your training will take place in classrooms and in the field
 
HELPFUL SKILLS:
Being a leader in the Army requires certain qualities. A leader exhibits self-discipline, initiative, confidence and intelligence. They are physically fit and can perform under physical and mental pressures. Leaders make decisions quickly, always focusing on completing the mission successfully, and show respect for their subordinates and other military officers. Leaders lead from the front and adjust to environments that are always changing. They are judged by their ability to make decisions on their own and bear ultimate moral responsibility for those decisions.
 
ADVANCED RESPONSIBILITIES:
Transportation Officers may continue in the Operations career field, serving in the Transportation Corps at ever increasing levels of leadership and responsibility.
 
Responsibilities of a Transportation Captain may include
 
  • Commanding and controlling company-sized transportation operations units (200-300 Soldiers).
  • Coordinating employment of Transportation Soldiers at all levels of command, from company to division level and beyond, in U.S. and multi-national operations
  • Developing doctrine, organizations and equipment for unique Transportation missions.
  • Providing instruction on transportation vehicles and systems at service schools and combat training centers.
  • Serving as Transportation advisor to other units, including Army National Guard and U.S. Army Reserve organizations.
 
RELATED CIVILIAN JOBS:
You'll be able to pursue a future with privately owned moving companies or freight operators
 
 
LIEUTENANT PHASE:
Once a cadet graduates, he/she is commissioned as a Second Lieutenant. The first thing a young officer does is develop in his/her primary branch by attending the Basic Course. After that, some officers opt for Airborne or Ranger training (or both). But most go right to their first duty assignment. Progressing from second to first Lieutenant, the young officer applies his/her training and develops his/her leadership abilities. In fact, learning how to lead troops is the key objective of this phase. Promotion to First Lieutenant takes about two years.
 
CAPTAIN PHASE:
A lot happens while you're a captain. The most important thing is to get experience as a company commander. A Company Commander normally is in charge of over 100 soldiers. Command experience, obviously, is a valuable resource throughout a career. During this phase, you attend the Officer Advanced Course. Then later in this phase, you will attend the Combined Arms and Services Staff School, which provides you with the necessary training to perform as a field grade staff officer. Additional training during the captain phase is your opportunity to become more valuable to the Army, since this is when you choose and begin to become qualified in a functional area. Promotion to Captain takes about four years.
 
MAJOR PHASE:
Being promoted to major signals a big step in your career. You've become a key staff officer in charge of such areas as Personnel, Intelligence, Operations or Logistics. You'll be given new assignments which permit you to use previously developed skills, as well as expand your overall professional development. The objective here is to develop further in your branch, and continue development in your functional area. Some officers area selected for Command and General Staff College or given the opportunity to attend civilian schools. Promotion to Major takes about 11 years.
 
LIEUTENANT COLONEL PHASE:
You're assignment might be as a Battalion Commander in charge of hundreds of soldiers or a general staff officer in a division or corps. Outstanding performance will merit more and more challenging positions. Some officers are selected for the Army War College. Where they become "experts" at their profession. Promotion to Lieutenant Colonel takes about 17 years.
 
COLONEL PHASE:
At this phase, the Army takes maximum advantage of your talents. This means you'll be assigned as a Brigade Commander in charge of thousands of soldiers or director of a large staff. Your technical skills and accumulated executive talents will be put to the test. This is the senior level of responsibility. You're a top executive. Promotion to Colonel takes about 22 years.
 
GENERAL OFFICER:
Officers who demonstrate extraordinary leadership and executive abilities are selected to be general officers; the CEO's of the Army. They do nothing less than run the Army. From division commanders to post commanders to high level staff positions, general officers are responsible for maintaining an efficient and effective Army. Promotion to General takes about 25 years.